onservation Ontario E-News

   Representing Ontario’s 36 Conservation Authorities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Summer 2008

www.conservationontario.ca

 

 

WELCOME to Conservation Ontario

E-News. This newsletter provides information and updates on issues about Conservation Authorities. Conservation Ontario represents Ontario’s 36 Conservation Authorities.

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe. Please share this e-bulletin with others.

 

Ontario’s 36 Conservation Authorities are community-based resource management organizations that manage Ontario’s water and land resources on a watershed basis.

 Map

 

Through the lands that they manage and own Conservation Authorities provide education and recreation programs to help us to understand and appreciate the value of our natural environment and the benefits of protecting it today

and for the future.

 

This summer issue of Conservation Ontario’s  E-NEWS provides information and links to Conservation Authority programs, facilities and activities that protect our environment as well as provide outdoor recreation and education experiences.

CONTENTS

CONSERVATION LANDS PROVIDE A DOORWAY TO OUR ENVIRONMENT

CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES PROTECT OUR ENVIRONMENT THROUGH THEIR LANDS

‘LIVING CLASSROOMS’

STEP INTO NATURE

BRINGING HISTORY TO LIFE

CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES RECOGNIZED FOR BUILDING ‘GREEN’

MORE GREAT PLACES TO VISIT

 

 

Which is YOUR FAVOURITE

Conservation Area?

Share it with everyone on our new

CONSERVATION LANDS PROVIDE A DOORWAY TO OUR ENVIRONMENT

 

Conservation Areas are lands which feature unique natural landscapes and a wide array of family-friendly activities for all ages of outdoor and nature enthusiasts. Most of them are easily accessible with many of them free of charge and located close to – or within – our communities.

 

Most important, Conservation Areas are lands where you will find important water resources that we rely on every day – wetlands, lakes, rivers, streams, waterfalls and groundwater. Conservation Authorities manage and protect both the water and the land resources which are so closely connected in our watersheds in order to ensure we have healthy communities now and for a long time in the future.

 

 

Order Your Guide to Conservation Areas in Ontario

In conjunction with Conservation Authorities, Conservation Ontario has launched a newly revised Your Guide to Conservation Areas in Ontario . This publication provides information on over 250 Conservation Areas located throughout all of Ontario’s regions – many of these are free and they are geared to a wide variety of interests and abilities. 

 

 

Search Our NEW Website

You can search for conservation areas online by activity, Conservation Area or Conservation Authority. www.ontarioconservationareas.ca.

 

 

Read articles about our visits to Conservation Areas

Something About Marshes(Ken Reid Conservation Area)

More Than Just Caves (Warsaw Caves)

How Lucky Are We (Spencer Creek and Webster Falls)

A Rare Find (Crawford Lake Conservation Area)

Huckleberry Finn For A Day (Elora Gorge)

The Past is Still Present (Fort Willow, Nottawasaga Valley)

 

 

 

 

Bruce’s Caves

Grey Sauble Conservation Authority

 

 

Building For Change

Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority

 

 

Luther Marsh

Grand River Conservation Authority

 

 

Sifton Bog

Upper Thames River Conservation Authority

 

 

Eramosa Karst Conservation Area

Hamilton Conservation Authority

 

 

 

Explore

 

 

 

 

To find out more info on Ontario’s

Carolinian Forest

Carolinian Canada

 

CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES PROTECT OUR ENVIRONMENT THROUGH THEIR LANDS

Conservation Areas play an important role in protecting valuable environmental features and systems within Ontario. A healthy environment is key to healthy communities.

 

Moraines absorb rainwater, storing it underground where it is filtered and released slowly back to the surface forming streams and wetlands. Nine Conservation Authorities are responsible for the largest and most strategically located tracts of land protecting the headwaters of the 65 river systems originating on the Oak Ridges Moraine. These lands include both environmentally significant and publicly accessible recreational lands such as the Ganaraska Forest Centre, Fleetwood Creek Natural Area and Purple Woods, Thornton Bales and Albion Hills conservation areas. LEARN MORE… about the Conservation Authority Moraine Coalition

 

Woodlands clean the air of pollutants including carbon dioxide; reduce runoff and flooding, and provide important shelter and habitat for animals, birds and plants. For example, the Long Point Region Conservation Authority’s watershed lies within the heart of the Carolinian Forest Zone, and contains some of the most significant tracts of Carolinian forest.

 

Wetlands help to clean water by absorbing nutrients, store excess water during wet seasons, and provide an important home for many species of plants, animals and birds. In the north, Mission Island Marsh is 17 hectares wetland owned by the Lakehead Region Conservation Authority, the marsh provides habitat within the city for a myriad of aquatic plants and animals. A boardwalk assists visitors to view the marshland.

 

 

A rich mix of Plants, Animals and Birds are provided with healthy habitats within all conservation areas. Under its Natural Heritage System Land Securement Project, the Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority protects sensitive ecological areas by purchasing or holding lands and properties on which they are located.

 

 

 

 

Students remember

10% of what they read
15% of what they hear
85% of what they DO

 

Fact Sheet

Conservation Authority Education Programs

 

Kortright Centre

Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

 

Mountsberg

Conservation Area

 Conservation Halton

 

Terra Cotta

Conservation Area

Credit Valley Conservation

 

LIVING CLASSROOMS

Conservation Authorities provide high quality outdoor environmental education experiences to Ontario’s young people.  Operating 64 Outdoor Education facilities, Conservation Authorities serve 82% of Ontario’s district school boards and are visited by more than 400,000 students annually.

Relying on provincial curriculum standards focusing on today’s important environmental issues, Conservation Authority education programs complement and enhance classroom lessons by providing students with hands-on activities. LEARN MORE

Conservation Authorities also host or participate in a number of Water Festivals held throughout the province. These events provide a great ‘hands-on’ way to learn about our water.

 

 

 

Explore a Wetland in Ontario Down At The Pond

 

Hike Ontario’s Good Walking in Conservation Areas

 

Camping in the Grand Valley

Grand River Conservation Authority

 

Lake Laurentian Conservation Area

Nickel District Conservation Authority

 

Fishing at Valens Conservation Area

Hamilton Conservation Authority

STEP INTO NATURE

Conservation Authorities work with other partners such as the Ontario Trails Council and the Oak Ridges Moraine Trail Association to provide a variety of hiking trails in Conservation Areas across the province. Stroll through forests, take a wetland boardwalk, or scramble up the escarpment and across the moraine.

Conservation Authorities’ websites feature a variety of hiking trails. For example, Conservation Halton established the Halton Hikes website and Footsteps for Trees hiking program to raise awareness of the great trails available in Halton and to engage the community in conservation.

 

Lots of other outdoor recreational activities are also available at Conservation Areas

Cycling of all kinds (including off road)

Fishing

Downhill and Cross Country Skiing

Canoeing and Boating

Picnicking

Swimming, water sports

Snowshoeing

Camping

 

To search for a favourite outdoor activity in different parts of the province, people can visit www.ontarioconservationareas.ca

 

 

 

 

Mill of Kintail

Mississippi Valley Conservation

 

Eau Claire George Conservation Area

North Bay/Mattawa Conservation Authority

 

The Harris Woolen Mill Ruins at Rockwood

Conservation Area

Grand River Conservation Authority

BRINGING HISTORY TO LIFE AT CONSERVATION AREA SITES

Some Conservation Areas offer a unique blend of natural and cultural heritage. At Backus Heritage Conservation Area, amid the 1200 acre natural property, the Long Point Region Conservation Authority features the Heritage Museum. The museum houses a number of exhibits pertaining to the many interesting aspects of the Long Point Area including storefront exhibits of businesses from the 19th century and the many shipwrecks of Lake Erie.

 

Ska-Nah-Doht, a recreated Iroquoian village of 1,000 years ago, is located in the beautiful surroundings of Longwoods Road Conservation Area, with the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority. The name Ska-Nah-Doht is from the Oneida language meaning "a village stands again". The village features 18 exhibits with a palisade maze and longhouse.

 

 

 

 

Homestead, LPRCA

 

 

SKa-Nah-Doht, LTVCA

 

 

 

 

Other Conservation Authorities with LEED designation:

 

Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority Administrative Headquarters

 

Rideau Valley Conservation Authority Administrative Headquarters

 

 

CONSERVATION NOTES

CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES RECOGNIZED FOR BUILDING GREEN

Two Conservation Authorities – Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority - have been recognized by the Sustainable Architectural and Building Magazine for their environmentally-friendly designs and operations. The nation-wide Sustainable Architecture and Building Magazine Award recognizes excellence in design & execution of Canadian buildings of all types including new and renovated buildings and interiors. Criteria are based on sustainable design, architectural excellence and technical innovation.

 

The Restoration Services Centre Building (Toronto and Region Conservation Authority) is located in Vaughan and is a centre for habitat regeneration and restoration projects.

 

Balls Falls Centre, NPCA

 

The Balls Falls Centre for Conservation (Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority) is a 12,000 sq ft facility located just outside of the community of Jordan. It features exhibits, displays and learning centres. The building itself is designed as a teaching tool to demonstrate conservation initiatives both through design features and daily operation of the facility.

 

 

 

 

Innovative features demonstrated by the two Conservation Authority projects include: HVAC technologies & system integration, rainwater harvesting, composting toilets, abundant natural light with southerly oriented windows and large roof overhangs, use of low ‘off-gassing’ materials, reduced energy consumption, and ground source heat exchanger.

 

This bulletin is produced by:

Conservation Ontario

P.O. Box 11, 120 Bayview Parkway, Newmarket Ontario L3Y 4W3

Tel: 905.895.0716 

info@conservationontario.ca

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe.       

Please share this e-bulletin with others.

 

Conservation Ontario represents Ontario’s 36 Conservation Authorities, local watershed management agencies located throughout the province.

Visit our website for more activities and information about Conservation Areas www.ontarioconservationareas.ca

 

More great places to visit at Conservation Areas:

 

*        Perth Wildlife ReserveRideau Valley Conservation Authority

*        Saugeen River Canoe RouteSaugeen Valley Conservation

*        Richardson Lookout – Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority

*        Fanshawe Pioneer VillageUpper Thames River Conservation Authority

*        Warsaw Caves – Otonabee Conservation     Read About It

*        Great Lookout at Sager Conservation AreaLower Trent Conservation Authority

*        Ken Reid Conservation Area – Kawartha Conservation     Read About It

 

 

Read about our trips to Conservation Areas or Share Your Favourite Conservation Areas Activities on Ontario’s Conservation Areas Facebook Page.

 

 

www.conservationontario.ca